Pilot Metropolitan Animal Print Fountain Pen Review

It's hard to believe that it's been more than two years since I published my original review of the Pilot Metropolitan. The pen regularly makes the short list of recommended starter pens and is one of the few fountain pens that you'll find in non-specialty stores. I thought that it would be fun to revisit the Metropolitan, and what better way to do it than with the Animal Print edition?

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The Metropolitan doesn't feel like an inexpensive pen. Its metal body provides a nice heft, and the cigar-shaped sleek design really is stunning to look at. The clip has some give but still grips material firmly, so you won't have to worry about the pen sliding around or coming loose in a bag or pocket.

Compared to pens like the Lamy Safari or Pilot Kakuno, the Metropolitan has an understated design that will fit right into an office environment. In my original review, I mentioned that the pen was a bit boring on the surface, and the Animal Print edition, although a step up in flare, still holds true to this. Compared to my black Metropolitan though, the Gold Lizard is a nice change of pace. I actually didn't realize that the pen was gold until looking at the product details. It seems to be a gold/silver blend, of which I'm a huge fan. If you're looking for a more colorful version of the Metropolitan, there's also the Retro Pop edition.

 Nope, the pens aren't different sizes. It's just the photo perspective.

Nope, the pens aren't different sizes. It's just the photo perspective.

The Metropolitan has my favorite clip cap of all the entry level pens that I've encountered. The cap seems almost magnetic when it clicks into place, and I would feel comfortable carrying the pen loose in my pocket, with no fear of leaks. It also posts nicely, with just a little bit of friction to lock the cap into place.

The Pilot Metropolitan's grip is made of smooth plastic and tapers towards the nib of the pen. Personally, I prefer the shaped grip of the Lamy Safari, or Lamy Vista, which reduces my hand fatigue during longer writing sessions, but the Metropolitan's thin grip still works nicely.

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The nib is one of the Pilot Metropolitan's best features. Sometimes inexpensive fountain pen nibs can be scratchy or suffer from skips or hard starts, but this isn't the case with the Metropolitan. The ink flows steadily for long periods of time, and the nib is very smooth for its price point.

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For $15 or so, the Pilot Metropolitan offers a fantastic experience for those looking for a starter fountain pen, and the Animal Print edition adds a creative touch to the pen's classic design. It comes with everything you need to get started, including both an ink cartridge and a converter for bottled inks. The squeeze converter is less efficient than twist converters that come with pens like the Lamy Safari, but it still gets the job done.

Will the Animal Print edition change your mind about the Pilot Metropolitan? Probably not, but it's still a damn fine pen for the price.

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This pen was provided at no cost by For My Desk, for the purposes of this review. If you're interest in the Pilot Metropolitan Animal Print Fountain Pen, check it out on their site!

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Zebra V-301 Fountain Pen Review

Interested in fountain pens but not sure where to start? There are plenty of pens that can be had for less than $20, but what about those ultra-affordable sub-$5 pens. The Zebra V-301 Fountain Pen is one such pen. How does it hold up against the likes of its low-price counterparts? Read on to find out.

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Those who use Zebra V-301 Series pens and pencils will be right at home with the fountain pen version. Aesthetically, the pen shares a similar design style, including black plastic grip. The ridges on the grip make the Zebra V-301 comfortable to hold for longer writing sessions, although the matte plastic is less appealing to the eye than the smooth plastic grips on pens like the Pilot Metropolitan. Still, it's a worthy tradeoff for sweaty fingers and cramped hands. For those looking to try an ultra-affordable fountain pen in the office, it's hard to recommend the Platinum Preppy, which looks as if it belongs in a high schooler's backpack, rather than a briefcase. The Zebra V-301, on the other hand, has a professional look that would fit right in, in an office environment.

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Two critical pieces of a fountain pen cap design are the way that the cap fits securely on the pen body and how the cap posts for writing. Overall, the Zebra V-301 posts nicely, with a solid click, but its capping experience leaves something to be desired. It does cap securely, so there's no need to fear a dry nib or ink-stained pants, but I found the Zebra V-301 occasionally difficult to cap. This seemed to get better with time, perhaps as the cap and plastic grip became worn in.

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One of the most interesting features of the Zebra V-301 is its hooded nib. One of the downsides of some ultra-affordable pens, such as the Platinum Preppy, is their flexible nibs, which can be easily damaged by heavy-handed fountain pen novices. The Zebra V-301, on the other hand, has a plastic hood that reinforces the back of the steel nib. The nib itself is hard-as-nails and offers very little flex. This might be a turnoff to some but offers great protection from accidental damage.

 The logo should be face-up, which is a small design flaw.

The logo should be face-up, which is a small design flaw.

The writing experience with the Zebra V-301 was surprisingly pleasant for a pen at its price point. The nib does run on the dry/scratchy side, and some online reviews did mention skips and clogs, but I used the pen as my daily driver for a week and didn't experience any major issues. Like the hood on the Lamy 2000, the hood on the Zebra 301 can obsure the view of the nib, making it more difficult to tell when the pen is at the appropriate writing angle. My guess is that this is somewhat responsible for the reviews that mention skips. I did notice a few skips after using the pen for extended periods, but I experience the same issues when using more expensive starter pens, like the Lamy Vista.

It's impossible to ignore price when considering the quality of a fountain pen. The Zebra V-301 is far from perfect, but for an average price of $3, it performs substantially well, even when compared to the Platinum Preppy. The reinforced nib makes it an excellent choice for fountain pen beginners, and the generous double ink refill will ensure that you'll have plenty of ink to put it through its paces.

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This pen was provided at no cost by For My Desk, for the purposes of this review. If you're interest in the Zebra V-301 Fountain Pen, check it out on their site!

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Introducing The Dreadful Objects - A Supernatural Mystery

I spend most of my time here talking about the tools that I use to write. Even though it's fun to explore the latest and greatest notebook or pen, it doesn't even come close to the joy of the writing itself. Today, I want to share a writing project that I'm pretty excited about. I've always wanted to write a novel, and a year and a half ago I started writing. Four months ago I finished the first draft, and a few weeks ago I finished the second. Today, I'm proud to announce the Kickstarter for my debut novel, The Dreadful Objects. The book is written, but I need your help to bring it to life.

The Dreadful Objects is a supernatural mystery about the power of seemingly ordinary objects to control our fates. You can check out the first few chapters here and the project video provides the full scoop.

It's rare that I make a direct ask of readers, but I would greatly appreciate it if you took a moment to check out the project's Kickstarter page and considered backing. For those of you interested in self-publishing, I plan to cover all of the ins and outs of my experience in regular backer updates. Even if you aren't able to contribute, you can help me immensely by sharing the project with the bookworms in your life.

I want to thank all of you for reading and for your support. Without this blog as an outlet and the awesome community of readers, this book would still be a thought in the back of my mind.

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Fountain Pen Holiday Gift Guide 2017

Shopping for Christmas gifts is always one of the most stressful parts of the holiday season. Would they like a toaster that monograms their whole wheat? How about a bluetooth speaker that’s shaped like a cat? It seems like every year it gets harder and harder for me to find creative gifts for friends and family, especially when most of them have everything that they could ever need (we live in a first-world country after all).

Pens and stationery have always been go-to gifts, but it turns out that the Cross pen you received for graduation is overpriced, and your birthday Moleskine actually provides a pretty terrible writing experience. Fortunately, there are plenty of great and affordable options, if you’re considering buying a loved one a fountain pen or a notebook for Christmas. But how do you choose from the countless options out there? I've looked back on my favorite things from the last few years and have compiled a short list of gift ideas for fountain pen beginners. Whether you’re buying a gift for a loved one, or a gift for yourself, these won’t disappoint, and I use most of these items daily. And why should you go analog for Christmas? Patrick Rhone has some inspiring thoughts on the matter. Note, the item titles link to my reviews, and the prices lead to sites where you can purchase items (affiliate links).

TLDR - Favorite Matchups:

Fountain Pens and Paper for Beginners


Lamy Vista - Under $25
Sure, many will recommend the Lamy Safari or Pilot Metropolitan, but the Vista beats them both, in my opinion. I love the Vista because it offers a sneak peak at the inner workings of the fountain pen. This pen is a clear (called a demonstrator) version of the Safari, which is one of the most recommended starter fountain pens. This pen comes with an ink cartridge, so it can be used right out of the box. You can also purchase a converter, if you want to use it with bottled inks.


TWSBI 580 AL - $65
So, you want something a bit nicer? TWSBI pens probably offer the best value and quality for the price. I use the TWSBI 580 AL everyday. No cartridges and no converters, just a piston with tons of ink capacity. For those unfamiliar with piston pens, check out this video to see how they work. This pen doesn’t use ink cartridges, so you’ll have to buy your loved one a bottle of ink. I make a few ink recommendations below, but you can also check out my penventory page for a full list of inks that I’ve reviewed.

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Lamy 2000 - $130
The Lamy 2000 is the best fountain pen that I have ever used. This gold-nibbed pen feels frictionless on paper and has a piston mechanism to hold lots of ink. This pen has been around for decades and for good reason. It doesn’t use ink cartridges, so you’ll need to pick up a bottle of ink to go with it. Note, gold nibs are softer than the steel nibs that you'll find on the other recommendations. Fountain pens require much less pressure to write than traditional pens, and pressing too hard can cause damage to the nib. This is especially true for gold nibs.

 Leuchtterm1917 with the Pilot Vanishing Point Fountain Pen

Leuchtterm1917 with the Pilot Vanishing Point Fountain Pen

Leuchtterm1917 Notebook - $20
Although you can use fountain pens on regular paper, they tend to leave more ink on the page and bleed and feather (spread out) on regular paper. If you’re looking for a nice notebook to accompany your nifty fountain pen gift, check out the Leuchtterm1917. It comes in tons of colors and works very well with fountain pens. I use one as my daily notebook.


So you’ve picked the perfect fountain pen for your Secret Santa, but how do you you chose from thousands of inks? You can check out the penventory for a full list of ink reviews, but I’ll save you some time. Try one of these:

Lamy Blue/Black Ink - Bottle or Cartridges
If you’re purchasing a fountain pen as a gift, you might as well spice it up with a non-black ink. Lamy inks are some of the best, most affordable inks on the market, and Blue Black is one of my personal favorites.

Diamine Pumpkin - Small Bottle - $10
For those who find black and blue a little boring, Diamine Pumpkin is the solution. This ink is my daily driver. It’s consistent and dark enough for note taking, but bright and colorful. Life’s too short to use boring ink, and Pumpkin pops on the page.

Iroshizuku Tsukushi - Small Bottle - $13
Tsukushi lives in my Lamy 2000 fountain pen at all times. Its brown tone stands apart from the traditional blue or black, but is still understated enough to work well as an everyday color.

What About Fountain Pen Nib Sizes

Choosing a nib size can be daunting, especially if you've never used a fountain pen before. The nib, by the way, is the tip of the pen, which has two tines that serve as channels for the fountain pen ink. I've provided an overview of the most common nibs below, and this will apply to all of the pens mentioned in the article.

TLDR: Buy a pen with a fine nib.

  • Extra Fine - Best for those who like teeny tiny writing.
  • Fine - For Lamy and TWSBI, I default to fine nibs. In my experience, this is the safest choice, if you're not sure which size to buy.
  • Medium - Lays a thicker juicier line. Not so great for regular note taking, but may be a good choice for those who like big bold letters.

Pro Tip: If you buy from a Japanese manufacturer (Pilot, Platinum, Sailor are the most common), buy a medium nib. Japanese nibs tend to run one-size finer than their western counterparts.

Hopefully these recommendations help you find the perfect gift for your loved one, but feel free to post any questions in the comments section below. Have other gift ideas? Let me know in the comments as well.

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The Road So Far

 Japan, 2010

Japan, 2010

Starting this blog was part of a journey to ground myself in the physical world, at a time when I was lost in a digital ocean. I’ve met many awesome people over the last two years and have discovered a love for pen and paper, but I realize that there was more going on behind the scenes than digital overwhelm. The search for the perfect writing tools was an excuse. The pens and paper were inherently meaningless, but it was the potential energy that became kinetic through them that I’d been longing for. I love pen and paper because of what they allow me to create.

It’s been quiet around here for the last few months, but I think of the blog daily and wonder where to take it. In the beginning of 2017, I wrote about the new and exciting seeds of opportunity on the horizon, and I spent the year watering the garden. The novel now sits at 55,000 words, and I hope to wrap it up in December. The new course that I received funding for is actually coming together and fully enrolled. I started a PhD program and have poured ample time into learning the ins-and-outs of educational research (and still have a long way to go). Life is truly coming together in unexpected ways, and I realize that none of this happened because of the pen or notebook that I used.

It's a funny thing when the mind realizes that sitting still is riskier than leaping into the unknown, and 2017 has been a year of leaps. In truth, taking chances was easy at first. Anyone can be brave for a short amount of time. I assumed that putting myself out there would be a one-time challenge, that I would take a chance and everything would fall into place. I found that every new opportunity came with another chance for rejection and spectacular failure. It was through this process that I realized overcoming self-doubt, fear of rejection, and anxiety wouldn’t be a one-time hurdle, but rather a series of small skirmishes in a lifetime war. Instead of throwing in the towel and resigning to my couch and The Great British Baking Show (ok, this still happens on occasion), I spent much of 2017 exploring and re-evaluating my relationship with fear and anxiety. The year was full of reading, reflection, and active experimentation, as well as spectacular personal growth.

 Looking inward in Aomori.

Looking inward in Aomori.

How does all of this translate to A Better Desk? I’ve written extensively about new writing tools over the last two years, but I’ve gotten to the point where I’m mostly happy with the tools that I have. I am more excited to put them to use than to continue reviewing new bits and bobs that really don’t add much additional value to my work. But I still feel that there’s work to be done here, and I found a bit of inspiration from my Start Here page, something that I’d written years ago:

Why A Better Desk? Having a better desk means more than using expensive apps, fancy pens, and a complicated paperless workflow. Sometimes it means reflecting on why we work the way we do and why we spend so much time worrying about the things that we can't control.

The answer was here all along, and I plan to broaden the scope of ABD within the upcoming year. This doesn’t mean that I’ll be dropping reviews completely, but I do plan to use the blog as a platform to explore all of the new topics, tools, and strategies that have made my life, work, and relationships more enjoyable. I'm not exactly sure where I'll end up, and I still have a long way to go, but I hope that you’ll come along for the ride.

 Japan, 2010

Japan, 2010

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